Sticky Rice

A Politics of Intraracial Desire

Cynthia Wu
Book Cover

PB: $29.95
EAN: 978-1-4399-1582-0
Publication: Sep 18

HC: $94.50
EAN: 978-1-4399-1581-3
Publication: Sep 18

Ebook: $29.95
EAN: 978-1-4399-1583-7
Publication: Sep 18

208 pages
6 x 9

Creating a queer genealogy of Asian American literary criticism

Read an excerpt from the Introduction (pdf).

Description

Cynthia Wu’s provocative Sticky Rice examines representations of same-sex desires and intraracial intimacies in some of the most widely read pieces of Asian American literature. Analyzing canonical works such as John Okada’s No-No Boy, Monique Truong’s The Book of Salt, H. T. Tsiang’s And China Has Hands, and Lois-Ann Yamanaka’s Blu’s Hanging, as well as Philip Kan Gotanda’s play, Yankee Dawg You Die, Wu considers how male relationships in these texts blur the boundaries among the homosocial, the homoerotic, and the homosexual in ways that lie beyond our concepts of modern gay identity.

The “sticky rice” of Wu’s title is a term used in gay Asian American culture to describe Asian American men who desire other Asian American men. The bonds between men addressed in Sticky Rice show how the thoughts and actions founded by real-life intraracially desiring Asian-raced men can inform how we read the refusal of multiple normativities in Asian Americanist discourse. Wu lays bare the trope of male same-sex desires that grapple with how Asian America’s internal divides can be resolved in order to resist assimilation.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction

  1. Veterans and Draft Resisters
  2. Learning to Love Ho Chi Minh
  3. Rebellion and Compromise
  4. Desire and Resistance
  5. Intrasettler Conflict
Epilogue
Notes
Index

About the Author(s)

Cynthia Wu is an Associate Professor of Gender Studies at Indiana University. She is the author of Chang and Eng Reconnected: The Original Siamese Twins in American Culture (Temple).


Subjects

In the Series

  • Asian American History and Culture edited by Cathy Schlund-Vials, Rick Bonus, and Shelley Sang-Hee Lee

    Founded by Sucheng Chan in 1991, the Asian American History and Culture series has sponsored innovative scholarship that has redefined, expanded, and advanced the field of Asian American studies while strengthening its links to related areas of scholarly inquiry and engaged critique. Like the field from which it emerged, the series remains rooted in the social sciences and humanities, encompassing multiple regions, formations, communities, and identities. Extending the vision of founding editor Sucheng Chan and emeriti editor Michael Omi, David Palumbo-Liu, K. Scott Wong and Linda Trinh Vú, series editors Cathy Schlund-Vials, Rick Bonus, and Shelley Sang-Hee Lee continue to develop a foundational collection that embodies a range of theoretical and methodological approaches to Asian American studies.