The Battles of Germantown

Effective Public History in America

David W. Young
Book Cover

PB: $29.95
EAN: 978-1-4399-1555-4
Publication: Sep 19

HC: $109.50
EAN: 978-1-4399-1554-7
Publication: Sep 19

Ebook: $29.95
EAN: 978-1-4399-1556-1
Publication: Sep 19

294 pages
6 x 9
5 figs., 17 halftones, 2 maps

Lessons from Philadelphia's Germantown neighborhood on how the public engages the past

Description

Known as America’s most historic neighborhood, the Germantown section of Philadelphia (established in 1683) has distinguished itself by using public history initiatives to forge community. Progressive programs about ethnic history, postwar urban planning, and civil rights have helped make historic preservation and public history meaningful. The Battles of Germantown considers what these efforts can tell us about public history’s practice and purpose in the United States.

Author David Young, a neighborhood resident who worked at Germantown historic sites for decades, uses his practitioner’s perspective to give examples of what he calls “effective public history.” The Battles of Germantown shows how the region celebrated “Negro Achievement Week” in 1928 and, for example, how social history research proved that the neighborhood’s Johnson House was a station on the Underground Railroad. These encounters have useful implications for addressing questions of race, history, and memory, as well as issues of urban planning and economic revitalization.

Germantown’s historic sites use public history and provide leadership to motivate residents in an area challenged by job loss, population change, and institutional inertia. The Battles of Germantown illustrates how understanding and engaging with the past can benefit communities today.

Reviews

Reflecting on how we make our contested past relevant to our diverse present, David Young, a gifted public historian, has chosen an ideal case study—Philadelphia’s richly historic Germantown. Its landscape includes austere Quaker and Mennonite meetinghouses, stately colonial mansions, George Washington’s summer White House, and a prominent stop on the Underground Railroad, alongside storefront churches, a shuttered high school, and shabby discount stores. In this provocative mix of historical analysis, reflection, and memoir, Young recounts Germantown’s ongoing efforts to preserve its history and present it to diverse audiences, including working-class neighborhood residents, blacks and whites, antiquarians, tourists, and the city’s elite. This is engaged history at its best.
Thomas J. Sugrue, Professor of History and Social and Cultural Analysis, New York University, and author of Sweet Land of Liberty: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North

David Young’s The Battles of Germantown ranges across many important facets of public history practice with stylistic flair and analytical heft. His multiplicity of approaches is the book’s greatest strength. Young’s primary concern is to reveal the extent to which Germantown, a richly historic section of Philadelphia’s northwest corner, emerged after World War I as an incubator for public history. This is, at once, a microhistory of a fascinating community, a genealogy of best public history practices during the past century, a study of the particular challenges of history making in urban places, and a professional memoir by one of the nation’s leading public historians. Young shows us that community engagement has a history and that understanding this history is vital for house museums motivated to make change. This book is a remarkable accomplishment.”—
Seth C. Bruggeman, Associate Professor of History and Director of the Center for Public History at Temple University and editor of Born in the U.S.A.: Birth, Commemoration, and American Public Memory

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations

Prologue
Introduction
1. Conversations: Experiences with Germantown’s Community of Memory
2. Amnesia: Negro Achievement Week, 1928
3. Authority: Which Germantown History—and Who Decides?
4. Integrity: Making the Johnson House the Heart of Historic Germantown
5. Projections: Empty Buildings of Germantown
Conclusion

Acknowledgments
Notes
Selected Bibliography
Index

About the Author(s)

David W. Young is the Executive Director of the Delaware Historical Society. He previously served as Executive Director of Cliveden, a historic site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and the Johnson House Historic Site, both located in the Germantown section of Philadelphia. He received his Ph.D. in history from Ohio State University.


Subjects

In the Series

  • History and the Public edited by Steven Conn

    The History and the Public book series, edited by Steven Conn, aims to foster conversations among practitioners, public historians, and academic historians of all stripes from the United States and internationally. This series begins with the assumption that almost all the work we do as historians has a public dimension and a public purpose. We will publish research monographs, author collaborations, and edited collections that examine the variety of ways in which history and historians interact with a wider public. The series will broaden our conception of what is meant by "public history," while also demonstrating the role historians can and should play in the civic arena. Submissions may be submitted to Steven Conn or Aaron Javsicas.